When to Get Help for Drug Addiction

Help for Drug Addiction

Getting help for drug addiction takes a lot of courage. Before wanting to seek help, a person must first realize they have a problem. A lot of people who have an alcohol or substance abuse problem are in denial and do not believe they have an issue. They may think they are not dependent but unbelievably they most likely are. Not everyone is able to realize they have a problem right away, it can and may take some time. It could be while they begin receiving help and they realize they do have a problem and that they are doing exactly what they should be doing, getting help!

Signs that Your Loved One Needs to Get Help for Drug Addiction

As you probably know, it can be very difficult to recognize early on that your friend or family member is involved in drugs or another addictive behavior. You should also know that your loved one is unlikely to admit to a problem. Addicts tend to cover their tracks. But there are a variety of signs that you might be seeing now, even ones you may have brushed aside, not wanting to believe that an addiction could be at play. See how many of these common warning signs of addiction that your loved one may have:

  • A shift in mood, attitude, and motivation
  • New friends and new hangouts
  • Poor performance at school or work and/or being absent
  • Secretive behavior such as lying
  • Sudden weight loss or gain
  • A sudden, unexplained increase in spending
  • Bloodshot eyes or enlarged pupils
  • Giving up once-favorite pastimes and hobbies
  • Strange body odors; trembling hands
  • Unusual changes in sleeping patterns or schedule

In addition, you may notice that your loved one now has angry outbursts and is more volatile or unpredictable. He/she may be inattentive and not follow through on assignments or obligations on time, or at all. You may find your loved one making secretive, unexplained phone calls or cash withdrawals, concealing what’s on his/her computer screen, or creating new bank or online accounts. His/her schedule may change frequently, often without your knowledge. Your loved might also be sleeping more or suffering from insomnia, choosing to wear sunglasses often, trying to cover up unusual breath or body odors. They, in general are changing in ways you cannot explain, excuse, or understand.

It’s also possible that your loved one is not paying their bills, asks to borrow money, or is taking or stealing money from you and others. You may notice your partner, friend, or relative feeling more melancholy and depressed (these can be psychological symptoms of withdrawal). And then, there are common physical symptoms when an addict tries to quit a substance; these withdrawal symptoms may include muscle aches, vomiting, sweating, trembling, fever, insomnia and diarrhea.

What to do When You Realize your Loved one has an Addiction

If simply talking to the person with the problem doesn’t work, a group intervention is an effective next step. Interventions also show addicts how their actions affect those they care about. The goal is to help the person struggling get into addiction recovery and rehabilitation. It can be hard to approach someone struggling with addiction. Although friends or loved ones mean well, they might not know what to say. The addicted person might also deny that they have a drug or alcohol problem, making open conversation difficult.

But it is very important they realize that they need to get help for drug addiction right away. The sooner a person receives help for drug addiction, the better. That does not mean it is ever too late. a fatal overdose is possible at any time and unexpected, but it does happen.

If you or your loved one have an addiction problem, do not hesitate to call for help today!

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *